Nothing is charming?

nothing-is-charming-sign-yokohama-198x For past week in Yokohama, I’ve been stumbling across sidewalk signs reading:
     Nothing is charming.
Mysterious.
But hey, everything in Japan is a bit mysterious…especially mangled engrish.
 
 
Nothing-charming-blackboard
When I finally bothered to read the fine print, I discovered out the Yokohama City government and local businesses especially Starbucks Coffee Japan are holding an holding a “light down event” (sic) named Nothing is Charming on December 11, which is the 21st anniversary of the Kyoto Protocol.

nothing^is^charming-banner

On Tuesday night from 7:00 to 8:00 PM, all lights in the cafes will be turned down to let people enjoy “Nothing” (and to “rethink our life without lights”). Originally the plan was to ban the use of any electronic devices during the “Nothing” event but the most recent press releases don’t mention that any more here in the Land of the Smartphone Obsessed.

CACA balls?

Wanna try some of my Cacaballs®?

 

cacaball-triptych
 

 

You could hope that the “Caca” refers to cacao beanlike seeds from which cocoa, cocoa butter, and chocolate are made and not the Oxford Dictionary’s definition of caca.
 

Previously we reported on the Japanese chocolate theme in:

 



 


myTOKYOGAS

my-tokyo-gas1In the 1980s, Tokyo Gas slapped the slogan on the side of thousands of their company’s trucks proclaiming, MY CITY–MY GAS®” (マイシティ—マイガス)

paccho-farting-5kb Now the company’s slogan is just myTOKYOGAS® and has a blue flame farting bear, Paccho-kun.
That’s a BIG improvement, right?
paccho-name-2paccho-fart-3pc-logo-mytg

It’s true GAS LOVE (3Yen / 2018-09-02), isn’t it?

 



 


T-shirt truth-in-advertising

 

Skinny Japanese girl’s T-shirt:

Minimal
Form

jay-gogh
  September 24, 2018

 

That skinny Japanese girl was wearing a “Minimal Form” T-shirt from the Euro brand ZARA…No Engrish involved.
girl-minimal-form

Somehow similarly…
I once took hyper-skinny Japanese sisters on vacation to the Grand Tetons and convinced them to wear The T-shirt.
little-grand-tetons

 

_________
A few of our many other fun examples of unintentional Japanese truth-in-advertising include:

 



 


Oops / Poops

‵‵Please carry away the toilet paper to the
restroom without putting it in the garbage can.
′′

Recently spotted oops-engrish at an upscale Tokyo hotel.

toilet-sign-engrish

The-rest-of-the-story…

Rude hoards of loud, littering, misbehaved Chinese tourists are the bane of the residents living/commuting/working near the major tourist areas of Tokyo and Kyoto. Typically mainland Chinese tourists are viewed as “pollution” by residents here, both Japanese and foreign (even by fellow “Chinese” from Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, etc.).

Specially, the strange signage about taking, ‵‵away the toilet paper to the restroom without putting it in the garbage can,′′ is caused by the puny plumbing in China (and other Asian countries) that cannot handle flushing toilet paper.
Chinese household sewer pipes are 50mm or less (2 in.) in diameter. Western plumbing is twice as large in diameter at 100mm (4 in.) or larger. In China there will be a basket by the side of the toilet for throw paper, yuck.


Translated from Japanese by Microsoft:
Don’t be surprised! This is the language level of a not-at-all-cheap hotel in the middle of Tokyo in 2018. Luckily I was able to poop and use the restroom correctly because I could read it in Japanese instead of English. Probably.

GAS LOVE ™

gas love logo

GAS LOVE (tm)
* A top page
* A living “with gas” navigator having gas
* Buttocks navigator of the gas

2. Event & campaign information
5. A commercial gallery

Click on “PLAY” (18sec. / WMV) gas-song player

Alternatively, listen to the MP3 (18 sec / 492 KB)
Boomp3.com

And how can anybody forget the (in)famous Tokyo ad campaign: MY CITY — MY GAS® (3Yen / 2008-09-24)
my city my gas

SCREW~!

screw

The fanclub of the Tokyo Yakult Swallows baseball team likes to SCREW.

Also checkout the Swallows’ English website at: yakult-swallows.co.jp/en/

________
A few of our many previous SCREWing reports include:


 


It’s official: In Japan Green is Blue

Japan’s National Police Agency’s official Japan’s official “Rules of the Road” manual defines the color “Blue” as “Green.”

 
The problem is, in Japanese green and blue are both referred to as Ao/. Therefore in Japanese traffic lights are called a Ao shingo/青信号, which literally translates to “Blue Signal.”
japanese-blue-light

Consequently, there is a confusion especially in older parking garages in the proper color of green lights as shown just above and below.

Since most street traffic lights in Japan have been replaced with LEDs in the past five years, most green lights—but not all—now conform to the international green standard.
Refer to The Japan Times of 2013/02/25: The Japanese traffic light blues: Stop on red, go on what?
CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 70

_____________
Previous reports of Japan’s traffic signals include:

 


tokyonama-texitle-logo-2Tokyonama, importer/distributer of original products from Japan–Geneva/Tokyo