Flying the flag, Japanese style

One of the first things you notice when you start living in Japan are all the cool prefectural flags (Wiki).
all-prefecture-flags

One of the first things you notice when you have lived in Japan for a while are all the funky prefectural flags. From Tokyo’s anus flag (3Yen / 2006-11-14) to Yokohama, Kanagawa’s limp dick flag (3Yen / 2006-11-14) Japan is full of unfortunate designs.



There is also the problem with inconsistencies of the designs and colors of each prefecture’s flag(s). Many Japanese prefectures have more than one “official” flag. There are traditional flags, sports flags, “symbol” flags, and even official “communicative” flags.

 


tokyonama-texitle-logo-2Tokyonama, importer/distributer of original products from Japan–Geneva/Tokyo
 



Mo’ manners

tokyo metro manners sign
Japanese on the trains are well-known for their manners and decorum…Just not for the handicapped (3Yen/2010-07-09: I have Secret Super Powers).

 

Tokyo-fart-metro-manners

 

Our previous reports of the Tokyo Metro’s manner posters include:

 



 


myTOKYOGAS

my-tokyo-gas1In the 1980s, Tokyo Gas slapped the slogan on the side of thousands of their company’s trucks proclaiming, MY CITY–MY GAS®” (マイシティ—マイガス)

paccho-farting-5kb Now the company’s slogan is just myTOKYOGAS® and has a blue flame farting bear, Paccho-kun.
That’s a BIG improvement, right?
paccho-name-2paccho-fart-3pc-logo-mytg

It’s true GAS LOVE (3Yen / 2018-09-02), isn’t it?

 



 


Manners, meh…There’re overrated.

*
Japanese manners, meh. There’re wa-a-a-y overrated*.

main-poster-reimagined_640x

amazing-manner-gaijin
*
Ok, ok, Japanese do form proper lines when they queue up for the trains.
But when they move onto the trains, it’s all asses-and-elbows akimbo in an amazing, unmovable pile of people pick-up-sticks—as alluded to in this Tokyo Metro manners poster.
manner-poster-reimagined-text-only-500x

Previous posts of Japanese train manners posters include:

 




Oops / Poops

‵‵Please carry away the toilet paper to the
restroom without putting it in the garbage can.
′′

Recently spotted oops-engrish at an upscale Tokyo hotel.

toilet-sign-engrish

The-rest-of-the-story…

Rude hoards of loud, littering, misbehaved Chinese tourists are the bane of the residents living/commuting/working near the major tourist areas of Tokyo and Kyoto. Typically mainland Chinese tourists are viewed as “pollution” by residents here, both Japanese and foreign (even by fellow “Chinese” from Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, etc.).

Specially, the strange signage about taking, ‵‵away the toilet paper to the restroom without putting it in the garbage can,′′ is caused by the puny plumbing in China (and other Asian countries) that cannot handle flushing toilet paper.
Chinese household sewer pipes are 50mm or less (2 in.) in diameter. Western plumbing is twice as large in diameter at 100mm (4 in.) or larger. In China there will be a basket by the side of the toilet for throw paper, yuck.


Translated from Japanese by Microsoft:
Don’t be surprised! This is the language level of a not-at-all-cheap hotel in the middle of Tokyo in 2018. Luckily I was able to poop and use the restroom correctly because I could read it in Japanese instead of English. Probably.

‘Wacky’ Japan ads

Wakino_Armpit_Ad_500x

Wacky spelled Waki—well actually Wakinoshita—means ‘armpit’ in Japanese. The WAKINO Ad Company (AXILLARY Ad Company) is trolling for our attention with these armpit ads according to Adweek.com:
This Japanese Company Believes That Renting Space on Armpits Is the Next Great Ad Frontier

 wakino ad company logo

WAKI-armpit-girls

WE’LL BE HAPPY!

we-ll_be_happywe-ll_be_happy_street

Goofy Google Translate of fvj.co.jp/vending
The happy “Two-Down” vending machine that you often see on Tokyo’s street is Wex Corp’s private brand vending machine…with reasonable pricing. We are aggressively offering a “two-down” vending machine that finds new demand and receives wide support.

 
drink-sizes-japanThe-rest-of-the-story…
When I first came to Japan in 1984, the fixed price of drink was 110 yen ($1 USD) for a measly 190 ml (6.4 oz) can. In 1986, the standard-throughout-Japan price went up to 120 yen but over the next few years the normal 350 ml (12 oz) can was introduced. To pay 120 yen, you must use three coins: one 100 yen and two 10 yen coins.120yen-in-coin

The reason that these 100 yen vending machines are called TWO DOWN is that they only need one 100 yen coin for a drink, which is two coins “down” from the normally required three. The happy Wex-Man character carries a big mallet to “Hammer Down/ハンマーダウン” prices with Wex’s colorfully loud blue and yellow vending machines that, “anticipated the Era (of Japan’s endless deflation since 1992).”
two-down-logo

 





The moon ultra parking is being recruited.

The moon ultra parking is being recruited, ri-i-i-ght.
moon-ultra-parking
月超駐車募集中/The moon ultra parking is being recruited is actually just word-for-word-literal translation of, ‘Monthly parking is available.’

 


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